DESCHUTES RIVER MULTI-DAY RAFTING TRIPS

An overnight journey on the Deschutes is a magical experience that you will never forget!

The multi-day section of Lower Deschutes provides plenty of sunshine and fun for beginners, families, and experienced boaters alike, making it one of the most frequently rafted rivers in Oregon. The river contains the perfect combination of thrilling whitewater with 50 miles of numerous exciting class II-III+ rapids, phenomenal camping, magnificent scenery, diverse and abundant wildlife, and a chance to get away and relax in the outdoors.

The Lower Deschutes was designated an Oregon Wild and Scenic Waterway in 1970 and a Federal Wild and Scenic River in 1988. The river is characterized by a deep and rugged rim rock-lined canyon that has canyon walls rising from 900 feet to 2,600 feet. This canyon carves its way through the eastern Oregon desert leaving behind one of the most impressive gorges in the west. From the placid calm floats to the raging whitewater, rafting the lower Deschutes has something for everyone to enjoy. Within this canyon you will be encountered with a vast geological and cultural history as well as a large variety of wildlife.

On the river one may see osprey, deer, bighorn sheep, salmon, steelhead and variety of other species. The basalt rock formations are breathtaking. On the upper portion of the lower Deschutes (from Warm Springs to Locked Gate) the river carves a deep canyon through the Mutton Mountains. As it winds through this gorge many impressive rapids are left behind in the rivers path. Such rapids like Trout Creek, Whitehorse, Buckskin Mary and Four Chutes are just a few that will be conquered. The river then charges through a small town called Maupin, which is where River Drifters and other companies operate their day trips. This stretch has the highest concentration of rapids per mile than any other section of the lower Deschutes. Rapids like Wapinita, Boxcar, Powerline, Surf City, Oak Springs, White River, and the Elevators, have all made this a popular stretch. From Sherars Falls to the mouth the river once again, travels through some very impressive landscape. Miles of canyons will greet the adventurer. The last eight miles of the Deschutes River are back-to-back rapids. Famous rapids on this section include Train Hole, Trestle, Wreck, Washout, Colorado, Gordon Ridge, Moody, and many others.

River Drifters offers a large variety of multi-day trips on the lower Deschutes, from just one night to four nights, there is a trip that is just perfect for your family or group. A typical two-day trip will cover more than 40 miles of water. A three-day trip will cover that same 40 miles, but at a much more relaxed pace. This will allow one to relax more at camp, with more time to fish, read, swim, explore a side canyon, or simply soak in their time with nature. A four or five-day trip will cover anywhere from 80 to 100 miles of river. These trips are ideal for those who want to make a true vacation of their experience.

An overnight journey is a magical experience that brings together a true wilderness setting with friendly, professional guides that make each and every trip very special. River Drifters takes you down the Deschutes River in style. We serve some of the best possible meals on the river. A typical full day on the river will include waking up to the coffee brewing at 7:30-8:00am as the guides are busy making your breakfast. You need lots of energy for a full day on the river!

After breakfast there will be a little time to relax in the warm desert sun, then you will pack your personal items into your drybag (each guest is provided with one) and the guides will pack up the gear boats and assist you in packing up your tents and other gear. Then its back to more whitewater rafting! Lunch is usually served at or near 12:00pm, this depends on the pace and timing of the trip. Lunch will consist of a hearty riverside lunch. The afternoon will consist of three hours or more of time on the water. You will arrive at camp around 4:30 to 5:30pm. Hors d’ oeuvres and beverages will be provided at or shortly after arrival to camp. At this time you will generally have an hour or more to indulge with some fishing, relaxation or a hike. Dinner will be excellent river cuisine, consisting of healthy & filling meals and of course accompanied with a scrumptious dessert!

Please note that these meals vary daily and we do cater towards vegetarians and special dietary requests (we must know this at the time of the reservation). Our goal is to serve you with healthy, generously proportioned meals that will keep you fueled for your adventure. After dinner there is plenty of time for storytelling and reliving the days ev

A Deschutes River multi-day trip is perfect for the whole family. We actually run special kids camps all summer long on the Deschutes. A child’s maturity level would be a greater factor than their age. We allow kids as young as four to join in on this adventure of a lifetime!  Essential Eligibility Criteria for participation

River Drifters will provide all the necessary gear to make your trip enjoyable, relaxing and most importantly, hassle free! Basically the only things you need to bring are a tent, sleeping bag and pad, clothes, personal items and we take care of the rest! View our Equipment List on this page for a comprehensive personal gear list. Rentals of tents and sleeping bags/pads are available to assist those who don’t have any.

Please visit our cancellation policy page for full details on cancellations, trip/date changes, and refunds.

“We took a 3 day, 2 night trip down the Deschutes River. Our whole family had an amazing time on the trip … Camp chairs in the cool water at river’s edge, a full kitchen, shade tarps, generous, delicious meals, and a cheery attitude. (Guides were) calm, confidence-inspiring, adventurous, sweet and fun … genuinely interested in each member of the group. The top-of-the-line equipment and planning and food were a great touch!”

– Beth Tittl

MULTI-DAY TRIP DETAILS AND ITINERARY

Meeting Location:

600 Timber Lane, Maupin, OR 97037
(Immediately next to 1399 N HWY 197)

Meeting Time:

8:30 am the day of your launch date

Return Time:

Between 2:30 and 3:30 pm on your last day

Getting Here:

Maupin is about 100 miles by car from the Portland/Vancouver Area and about 90 miles from Bend.

We’ll meet you at 8:30 am on the morning of the first day your trip begins at our outfitter in Maupin, Oregon (600 Timber Lane, 800-972-0430). At the pre-trip meeting we will give you your waterproof bags, go over final trip logistics and answer any last minute questions. You will leave your vehicles and keys at the outfitter and we will transport you to the river (1 hour). At the conclusion of the trip we will return you to the outfitter (30 minutes).

Driving Directions from the Portland/Vancouver Area

Access I-84 East toward The Dalles. Drive about 80 miles & take exit 87 to US-197 South toward Dufur/Bend. Drive about 40 miles until you reach Maupin. The River Drifters office is located at 600 Timber Lane, next to the Deschutes Motel.

Alternative Route: If you’re coming from south of Portland, drive on US-26 East. Travel through Government Camp. After you enter the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, turn left onto OR-216 East toward Maupin. Drive about 26 miles before turning right onto US-197 South. Just before you enter town, the River Drifters office is located on the RIGHT-hand side of the road next to the Deschutes Motel.

Driving Directions from the Tri-Cities Area

Drive on I-82 East and take exit 179 on to I-84 West. Once you reach The Dalles, take exit 87 going South on Highway 197 S toward Dufur / Bend. Drive about 40 miles until you reach Maupin. The River Drifters office is located at 600 Timber Lane, next to the Deschutes Motel.

Driving Directions from Central Oregon

Take US-97 North. Travel through Madras and veer right (immediately before McDonalds), staying on US-97.
Drive about 25 miles until you reach US-197 North. Veer left and travel about 21 miles to Maupin.
Follow the highway across the bridge and up the hill, through downtown and up the hill again.
Just after you exit town, the River Drifters Office is located on the LEFT-hand side of the road next to the Deschutes Motel.

Pre-trip Checklist
  • Complete online registration
  • Complete online waiver
  • Plan for the unexpected (travel insurance)
  • Gather and pack your gear
What we provide
  • Group rafting gear – rafts, paddles, & first aid kits
  • Optional – single or tandem inflatable kayaks
  • Personal rafting gear – PFD (personal flotation device), splash jacket & wetsuit (cooler weather trips), & helmet (optional)
  • Transportation to & from the river
  • All on-river meals, snacks, & beverages
  • Waterproof dry bag for personal gear (16” x 33”)
  • All camp cooking & kitchen supplies, including camp chairs
  • Rent for additional fee – tent, sleeping bag, and sleeping pad
What you are responsible for
  • Meals and lodging before and after your trip
  • Personal clothing and other miscellaneous items (see equipment list)
  • Sleeping bags and tents (these items can be rented from River Drifters – see equipment list)
  • Guides gratuities (see below)
Professional Tips

Wetsuits and splash jackets are often recommended for spring and fall trips, and for guests spending time in inflatable kayaks. The wetsuits are 2-3ml “Farmer John” style, which is combined with a splash jacket to provide full-body coverage. Wetsuits and splash jackets are suggested when the air temperature is 75°F or cooler, however children and individuals who get cold easily may want these additional layers when the air temperature is forecasted to be between 75°F to 80°F. Wetsuits and splash jackets are provided by River Drifters and our guides will issue out this gear on cooler weather trips or upon request.

Fleece is a generic term for a spun, polyester fabric developed for outdoor use. It is thick and fluffy and does not absorb water, making it ideal insulation on a river trip. It is commonly called Polartec or Polar Fleece. Polypropylene is a thinner, stretchier, woven variation used predominantly for long underwear. Any polypropylene long underwear will work; heavyweight is the most versatile.

Layering your clothing is an effective way to adjust to the daily weather changes that you may encounter. A light polypropylene layer under a heavy fleece top under a rain shell will get you going on the chilliest of mornings and allow you to shed layers as the day warms up.

One of the handiest things to bring on a trip is a sarong. Versatile, comfortable and colorful, sarongs get used for quick clothing changes, beach throws, sun screens and dinner celebrations.

Dry-bags are great for keeping things dry but are somewhat awkward for packing and living out of, (they are tall and narrow with a small opening at the top). Compact sleeping bags are much more convenient, and small stuff sacks, pillow cases or zip-lock bags are helpful for dividing up your stuff inside the bag. Trying to put your entire duffel bag or luggage into the dry-bag never seems to work.

Lodging
  • River Run Lodge: 541-980-7713
  • Imperial Lodge: 541-395-2404
  • The Oasis Resort: 541-395-2611
  • Deschutes Motel: 541-395-2626
  • Balch Hotel: 541-467-2277 (Dufur, OR.)
  • Various lodging options in The Dalles, Hood River, & Government Camp areas.
Camping
  • Maupin City Park: 541-395-2252
  • Riverview Campground: 541-395-2611
  • Primitive camping along the Deschutes River Access Road on a first come, first serve basis.
  • Campgrounds in Mt. Hood National Forest
Camping & Lodging near Maupin (some GREAT gems to stay at)!
Day 1:

Check-In: Check-in time is 8:30am at River Drifters Outpost in Maupin, Or. Guests will check in with one of our guides in front of the office. You’ll pack your personal belongings into a waterproof dry bag (provided by River Drifters), change into river clothes, use the restroom, etc. We sell many commonly forgotten items, such as sunglass straps, sunscreen, lip balm, and more in our retail shop as well. Guest car keys are kept secured in our office during the trip. After packing is complete, the group will load up into the shuttle vehicle and drive to the river put-in.

Shuttle & Arrival at Put-In: It is about an hour drive to the put-in at Trout Creek, and we usually arrive by 11:00am. Our guides will unload equipment, put the final touches on preparing the rafts, give a safety talk, and provide instructions on paddle strokes. Then, time to go rafting!

On the River: While on the river, there will be numerous rapids to paddle through, and opportunities to float in the river, ride the bull, and enjoy calm stretches with stunning scenery and chances to see wildlife. After a couple of hours on the river, the group will stop for a riverside lunch then it’s back on the water until we reach camp around 4:30-5:00 pm.

At Camp: Once at camp, you’ll change into dry clothes, set up your tent, and your guides will give a short camp introduction and orientation. Hors d’oeuvres and beverages will be provided shortly after arrival. Camp is your free time to go for a hike, relax by the river, fish, play games, or read a book. The guides will prepare dinner, which is served around 7:00pm. After dinner and dessert, enjoy the sunset over the canyon rim and star gazing before bed.

Day 2, 3, and/or 4:

Morning: You’ll wake to coffee and tea brewing by 8:00am while your guides are busy making a healthy and hearty breakfast. After breakfast, the group will break down camp, and be on the water between 9:00 and 10:00am.
On the River & At Camp: Routine is the same as Day 1.

Last Day:

Morning: Breakfast and coffee are served around 8:00 am. The group will break down camp and hit the water between 9:00 and 10:00am.
On the River: The group will raft into Maupin and stop at Maupin City Park for a BBQ lunch around 12:30 pm. After lunch there is still another 10 river miles with several exciting back-to-back rapids before reaching Sandy Beach, the take-out.

Shuttle & Arrival Back to River Drifters Outpost: A River Drifters transportation vehicle will pick-up guests at Sandy Beach and shuttle the group back to our outpost in Maupin. The shuttle back is about 15-20 minutes, and you can expect to return by 3:00-3:30pm. Once back at the office, collect your car keys, unpack personal belongings, and return any River Drifters issued equipment and gear. Change into dry clothes and check out your trip photos before heading home.

Please keep in mind that every trip is different, as weather, water flow, campsites, and group dynamics all influence trip pace

In the summertime, the weather in Eastern Oregon is typically very warm and mostly dry. However, you must be prepared for rain and wind in every season, and changes in the weather throughout the day. Air temperatures can fluctuate significantly between daytime and nighttime as well. When planning and packing for your rafting trip, please check the weather forecast, including daytime and nighttime temperatures. If air temperatures are on the cooler side, River Drifters has additional gear to outfit our guests.

May June July August September
Avg Day 70°F 77°F 86°F 87°F 82°F
Avg Night 46°F 53°F 59°F 55°F 50°F
Rainfall 1″ 0.75″ 0.5″ 0.15″ 0.25″
Wetsuits and splash jackets are often recommended for spring and fall trips, and for guests spending time in inflatable kayaks. The wetsuits are 2-3ml “Farmer John” style, which is combined with a splash jacket to provide full-body coverage. Wetsuits and splash jackets are suggested when the air temperature is 75°F or cooler, however children and individuals who get cold easily may want these additional layers when the air temperature is forecasted to be between 75°F to 80°F. Wetsuits and splash jackets are provided by River Drifters and our guides will issue out this gear on cooler weather trips or upon request.

We primarily use paddle rafts but sometimes we also use oar-paddle combination rafts. Everyone should come expecting to be active participants in the trip regardless of which type of raft you end up in. If there are any physical limitations, please reach out to us so that we can make sure to accommodate any adjustments you will need.

Paddle Rafts

Paddle rafts are 13 to 15 feet long and carry between 4 and 8 paddlers who actively paddle through the rapids and down the river. Everyone has a paddle, sits on the outer tube of the raft and follows the commands of the paddle guide who sits in the rear.

Oar-Paddle Combo

Oar-paddle combination rafts are 13 to 15 feet long and are configured so that four or six paddlers can assist a guide who rows the raft using oars.

Inflatable Kayaks

Inflatable kayaks are 10 – 12 feet long and are paddled by 1 person using double-bladed paddles. They are fairly stable, require no previous experience and allow you to feel the thrill of independently paddling the river.

Please note that we do not guarantee space in inflatable kayaks. We will bring a few, but if there are more people who wish to ride in these boats than there are spaces, we will rotate so that everyone gets a chance to participate.

Oar Rafts

Oar rafts are 15 feet long, and carry all of the overnight gear. They are rowed by a guide using oars attached to a metal frame. The guide will pace ahead of the trip to be able to claim and set up the best campsite available while you enjoy the river and views.

All meals, including kid-friendly options, are supplied by River Drifters, and prepared by your guides during the trip. Meals include a wide variety of fresh meats, cheeses, grains, fruits, and vegetables. We also provide plenty of snacks and water throughout the trip. Our online registration gives guests an opportunity to share dietary needs or allergies with us prior to your trip. We ask that registration is completed at least one week before your trip so we can do our best to accommodate any needs or restrictions. Please give us a call with any specific questions about meals.
A typical day on the water includes five to eight hours of rafting, a lunch break, swimming breaks, and wildlife viewing. Evenings at camp are a great time to go hiking, toss the frisbee, fish, read a book, take a nap, or relax by the water in a camp chair. Keep in mind that every trip is different, as the weather, water flow, campsites, and group dynamics all influence the trip pace and itinerary. Campsites along the overnight section of the Deschutes River are first come first served, which is why our guides aim to hit the water at a standard time each day.

There are many campsites along the Deschutes with developed toilet facilities. All rafts are required to carry an approved portable toilet, which serves as a back-up when developed toilets are not available. If the portable toilet is needed during a trip, our guides will ensure it is set up in a private location and discuss its use and the “key” system with guests. River Drifters practices Leave No Trace ethics, meaning we pack out all trash (including food scraps) and use only biodegradable soap for washing dishes. We expect our guests to help us adhere to Leave No Trace practices by ensuring no trash or food scraps are discarded into or along the river or left behind at camp. If you have any questions about personal sanitation, please don’t hesitate to ask your guide

If you truly enjoy your trip, tipping is a great way to show your appreciation. Tipping is optional and personal, but since a lot of people ask, a customary amount is between 10 and 15 percent of the trip cost. Tips can be given to the Lead Guide who will share them with the entire crew. And the entire crew will appreciate them and put them to good use. (And thank you.)

If you still have questions, please feel free to call us (800-972-0430) or e-mail us (office@riverdrifters.net). We love to talk about our trips!

EQUIPMENT LIST

Your comfort is our top priority. River Drifters handles all the trip logistics, provides all the necessary camping provisions and rafting gear, and makes sure that you have professional, experienced, and well-trained guides. Please read through and adhere to our packing recommendations as it improves your comfort while on the river and at camp. If you have any questions about the gear or packing list, please call our office at 800-972-0430.

Come prepared for challenging weather conditions. Do not skimp on this list.

CAMP ITEMS

These will be packed in your dry bag and will generally not be available during the day.

  • Compact sleeping bag*, (down or synthetic, rated to 30 degrees). Available to rent, see below.
  • Closed-cell foam or self-inflating sleeping pad*, (Thermarest, or Paco Pad). Available to rent, see below.
  • Sleeping bag liner* (will add warmth on cold nights)
  • Compact, lightweight tent*, (free-standing preferred, no wall tents please) or small tarp or ground cloth. Available to rent, see below.
  • Your favorite pillow (an extra pillow-case is handy for organizing stuff in your bag).
  • Changes of clothing (versatile pants and shirts, cotton is fine)
  • Camp shoes. Our guides wear flip-flops or lightweight trail-running shoes.
  • Small towel, soap and shampoo (Campsuds and Dr. Bronner’s seem to be the most environmentally friendly; Ivory is fine).
  • Personal hygiene items, including medicine, insect repellent, dry-skin lotion, etc. Please bring double the amount needed of any essential medicine.
  • Warm jacket, (thick fleece is great – will work on-river as well – or compact/down coat).
  • Rain gear, jacket for sure, rain pants recommended (depending on the time of year and forecast)
  • Small flashlight with extra batteries, (headlamps are great).
  • Book, sketch pad, journal, etc.
RIVER ITEMS

These will be worn, or packed in your personal dry-pack and will be accessible during the day

  • Base layer (comfort): swimsuit and polypro pants/tights and long-sleeved polypropylene shirt
  • Insulation layer (warmth): thick fleece top, (pullovers work best)
  • Outer layer (waterproof): wetsuit or drysuit. River Drifters will provide wetsuits; if you have your own wetsuit or drysuit, you should bring it. No one has ever regretted renting a drysuit, (see below for more information)
  • Outer layer (waterproof): splash jacket or dry-top. River Drifters will provide splash jackets; if you have your own dry-top, you should bring it
  • Outer layer (fashion): shorts to wear over your wetsuit
  • On your feet (protection): shoes or sandals that will stay on while swimming and are comfortable to hike in. No flip-flops, slip-ons or aqua shoes for on the river.
  • On your feet (warmth): wetsuit booties, neoprene, fleece or wool socks under your shoes
  • On your head (warmth): a fleece or wool beanie (can be worn under helmet if you choose to wear one)
  • On your hands (warmth): neoprene gloves or dishwashing gloves over fleece gloves (surprisingly effective)
  • Lightweight cotton or synthetic clothing for sun protection
  • Waterproof sunscreen/block (SPF 30), lip balm
  • Sunglasses with strap (maybe not your best pair)
  • Small water bottle, 1 quart (essential – even if it’s just an empty plastic Gatorade bottle)
OPTIONAL ITEMS

Not absolutely necessary but you are welcome to bring them.

  • Waterproof camera
  • Sarong (very versatile)
  • Locking carabiner, handy for securing your day-pack.
  • 1 or 2 plastic garbage bags and some gallon size zip-locks for organizing gear.

We will provide: a wetsuit and splash jacket plus chair, cup, plate, and eating utensils for each guest.

Please do not bring: Valuable jewelry, bluetooth speakers, guns or irreplaceable items.

*RENTAL GEAR

We have good camping equipment available to rent. Reserve and pay for it in advance, pick it up at the pre-trip meeting, leave it behind when you’re done; simple.

Sleep Kits (tent, sleeping bag, and sleeping pad) are $25 each per person.
If you only need one or two of the three sleep kit items, they are $10 each per person.

DRYSUITS

Drysuits are waterproof coveralls (and wonderful.) They have tight-fitting latex wrist and neck gaskets and integrated neoprene or latex socks; combined with an insulation layer, they are the warmest, driest, coziest way to stay warm on the river on a cold day. They are also expensive, specialized, and fragile; even if you can find a friend who has one, they may not want to loan it to you. Oregon River Gear rents drysuits for about $199/week. You will need your own insulation layer (polypro, fleece, etc.) but if you are worried about being cold on the trip (who isn’t?), consider a drysuit.

ON THE RIVER:

ON HOT DAYS you will want clothing that dries quickly (nylon shorts and bathing suits) and something to shield you from the sun, (a high-tech SPF long-sleeved shirt or an old lightweight cotton dress shirt and maybe even lightweight long pants or capris). Also, a brimmed hat and a bandana are helpful for staying cool.

ON COOL DAYS you will want a thick, synthetic fleece top, (pullovers are best) and a sturdy, fully waterproof rain shell. You may also want fleece pants or polypropylene long underwear bottoms and rain pants, particularly before mid-June. Don’t bring a cotton sweatshirt and a windbreaker; cotton is worthless when wet and won’t work for on-river insulation and you need something waterproof over your fleece.

ON YOUR FEET you will want shoes that stay on if you go for a swim and are comfortable for hiking. Sport sandals with heel straps (Tevas, Chacos, Keen, etc.) work well, (buckles are better than velcro). Old running shoes work well and are easy to find. Neoprene, wool or fleece socks will add a bit of insulation under shoes or sandals. Wetsuit booties work but can be a bit clammy after a full day.

Think layers. The key to being comfortable on the Deschutes is being dry and adaptable; a thin synthetic layer (polypro) next to your skin with a thick synthetic layer (fleece) over it with a waterproof layer (wetsuit and splash jacket or drysuit) over that seems to work the best. Feet and hands get cold easily and we suggest wetsuit booties or neoprene socks under sturdy shoes and neoprene gloves or fleece and dishwashing gloves. Cotton is worthless when wet and should not be used for on-river insulation.

IN CAMP

In camp you will want comfortable walking/hiking shoes, (flip flops, lightweight boots or tennis shoes), and versatile clothing, (T-shirts, warm shirts, cotton shorts, jeans or sweats, extra fleece, etc). Cotton is fine for camp stuff, but because it is worthless for keeping you warm on the river, many people bring two sets of fleece – one for the river, one for camp – and have a backup in case one gets drenched.

Professional Dressing Tips

‘Fleece’ is a generic term for a spun, polyester fabric developed for outdoor use. It is thick and fluffy and does not absorb water, making it ideal insulation on a river trip. It is commonly called Polartec or Polar Fleece. Polypropylene is a thinner, stretchier, woven variation used predominantly for long underwear. Any polypropylene long underwear will work; heavyweight is the most versatile.

Layering your clothing is an effective way to adjust to the daily weather changes that you may encounter. A light polypropylene layer under a heavy fleece top under a rain shell will get you going on the chilliest of mornings and allow you to shed layers as the day warms up.

Our guides say that one of the handiest things to bring on a trip is a sarong. Versatile, comfortable and colorful, sarongs get used for quick clothing changes, beach throws, sun screens and dinner celebrations.

Where to find it:

Local outdoor or sporting goods stores should have everything you need and fleece garments are now available at most department and closeout stores. Great selections of river trip gear are also available on-line through:

  • Pacific River Supply (drysuit rentals)
  • Northwest River Supplies
  • Columbia Sportswear
  • REI
  • Patagonia
Professional Shopping Tip
  • Thrift Store

CAMP ITEMS go in a watertight dry bag provided by River Drifters (one per person). These are not accessible during the day. Each bag is roughly 16 inches in diameter and about 33 inches tall (the size of a garbage bag). ALL your personal items, including sleeping bag and pad, must fit inside this one bag (tents can be separate). Although we will show you how to close the dry bag so that it stays watertight even if temporarily submerged, packing your sleeping bag in a garbage bag provides extra protection. Zip-lock bags and small stuff sacks are good for keeping track of small and/or wet things inside your bag.

RIVER ITEMS will go in a watertight dry-pack provided by River Drifters (one per person). These small packs are 11 inches in diameter and 24 inches tall, perfect for rain gear, fleece, sunblock, and other things you want to keep handy during the day. For expensive cameras we recommend a Pelican Box, which can be found at most surplus and outdoor stores.

Professional Packing Tip

Our dry-bags are great for keeping things dry but are somewhat awkward for packing and living out of, (they are tall and narrow with a small opening at the top). Compact sleeping bags are much more convenient, and small stuff sacks, pillow cases or zip-lock bags are helpful for dividing up your stuff inside the bag. Trying to put your entire duffel bag or luggage into the dry-bag never seems to work.

Deschutes River Multi-Day Rafting Trips

Deschutes River Two-Day

Season: May - October
Duration: 2-Days, 1 Night
Length: 42 miles
Price: $325-365 (not including boater passes and BLM land use fee)
Rapids: I-III
Skill Level: Family and beginner friendly
Age Minimum: 4
Trip Itinerary

BOOK NOW Customized trips: call for booking info. 8 person minimum.

Deschutes River Three-Day

Season: May - October
Duration: 3-Days, 2 Nights
Length: 42+ miles
Price: $399-475 (not including boater passes and BLM land use fee)
Rapids: I-III
Skill Level: Family and beginner friendly
Age Minimum: 4
Trip Itinerary

Oregon Overnight Rafting

Deschutes River Four-Day

Season: May - October
Duration: 4 Days, 3 Nights
Length: 42-60 miles
Price: Custom
Rapids: I-III
Skill Level: Family and beginner friendly
Age Minimum: 4

BOOK NOW Customized trips: call for booking info. 8 person minimum.

Deschutes River Five-Day

Season: May - October
Duration: 5-Days, 4 Nights
Length: 100 miles
Price: Custom
Rapids: I-III
Skill Level: Family and beginner friendly
Age Minimum: 4

BOOK NOW Customized trips: call for booking info. 8 person minimum.

Are you ready for your rafting adventure on the Deschutes River?