ROGUE RIVER MULTI-DAY RAFTING TRIPS

Iconic river trip for outdoor enthusiasts, families, and experienced rafters!

Nestled deep in the coastal Siskiyou Mountains of southwest Oregon, the Rogue River features lush forests, deep green pools, sparkling waterfalls, classic rapids, and a rich past dotted with natives, pioneer families, and early whitewater boaters. In 1968 Congress passed the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act to preserve the nation’s outstanding rivers. The Rogue was one of the eight original rivers protected by this act. Congress validated what an exclusive group of adventurers already knew; that the Rogue River canyon was a rare treasure. A river rafting trip on the Rogue River is truly one of the best family vacations one can have.

The Rogue River voyages are the oldest and most famous river trips in the Northwest. As early as the 1920’s, Hollywood stars and presidents paid local guides to journey with them through the canyon for fishing, sightseeing, and whitewater thrills. The Rogue quickly developed a legendary reputation as one of the West’s greatest adventures. In this era, Glen Woolridge became one of the original river guides. Much of the river’s illustrious boating history is recounted in his book, A River To Run.

Before the 1900’s, the Rogue was home to the Takelma and Tutuni tribes. These nomadic people moved from the coast to this mountain river to harvest the abundant population of salmon and steelhead. Early exploration by French trappers brought conflict, and the French began calling the tribes “coquins” or rogues. The river became known as “La Riviere aux Coquins” which was later shortened to the Rogue River.

White settlement in the Rogue valley boomed after the discovery of gold in the canyon. The Lower Rogue, where our trip takes place, remained wild and untamed. The lure of precious metal did bring newcomers. Most were hermit miners who worked along the many side creeks. Some were packers or pioneer families who made a living offering services for the miners. The gold rush put pressure on local resources and by the late 1800’s the Takelma and Tutuni were gone.

All along, the Rogue wilderness has been home to a variety of wildlife. Deer, black bear, river otters are often seen on the river banks or swimming in a rapid. The Rogue has been famous for its strong salmon runs and an observer can still spot salmon leaping the main drop at Rainie Falls or cooling off at the mouth of a side creek.

Osprey and bald eagles have firmly reestablished permanent homes in the canyon; each with different fishing techniques. The osprey dive head first into the river and submerge much of their body before flying away with a fish in their beaks or claws, while eagles fly inches above the water and use their talons as sharp hooks to scoop and snare the fish that swim just below the surface.

Much of the Rogue’s mysterious charm resides in its lush verdant surroundings. The dense forest is one of the oldest and most diverse in the country. The canyon is essentially blanketed in green. Huge pine and fir trees mix with dramatic madrones, maple, mock orange and myriad wildflowers. The lower canyon has dozens of side creeks with fern-lined grottos and some of the most spectacular swimming holes anywhere. Side canyon streams provide stellar hikes and habitats such as Tate Creek and Floral Dell featuring breathtaking waterfalls that cascade down verdant mini-canyons.

The narrow confines of the lower Rogue canyons create some of the best whitewater in the West! Fun friendly rapids are interspersed with large calm pools through a maze of river boulders. Some rapids are consecutive like Tyee, Wildcat, and Slim Pickins rapids that lead to Black Bar Falls. The adrenaline mile before Mule Creek Canyon leads to the infamous Blossom Bar. The river is a camp rafting paradise and a great introduction to the outdoors for all skills levels.

The age minimum for this trip is 8 years old. The physical and mental criteria for eligibility to participate on any River Drifters river trip can be found on our Essential Eligibility Criteria for participation page.

River Drifters will provide all the necessary gear to make your trip enjoyable, relaxing and most importantly, hassle free! Basically the only things you need to bring are clothes and personal items and we take care of the rest! On the Rogue River, we provide the tents, sleeping bags, and sleeping pads (no rentals needed). View our Equipment List on this page for a comprehensive personal gear list. 

Please visit our cancellation policy page for full details on cancellations, trip/date changes, and refunds.

“Our group absolutely loved our rafting experience on the Rogue River with River Drifters! The river canyon itself was stunningly beautiful. Our guides got us down the river safely and took care of everything we needed in camp, going above and beyond …. We will do another rafting trip and it will absolutely be with River Drifters! I highly recommend them!!”

– L. Bowly

MULTI-DAY TRIP DETAILS AND ITINERARY

Meeting Location:

The Galice Resort
11744 Galice Road, Merlin, Oregon 97532

Meeting Time:

9:00 am the day of your launch date

Return Time:

Between 1:30 and 2:00 pm on your last day

Getting Here:

We will meet at the Galice Resort in Merlin, Oregon. The Resort is located 30 minutes from downtown Grants Pass & 1 hour from Medford, Oregon. Please plan to arrive at Galice Resort or Grants Pass the night before the first day of the trip. Galice Resort is one lodging option the night before your trip, and there are many options in Grants Pass as well.

Vehicle Shuttle

Your vehicle can be shuttled to the take-out at Foster Bar by a shuttle service (recommended) or guests can take the River Drifters van back to Galice Resort from the take-out on the last day of the trip

We’ll meet you at 9:00 am on the morning of the first day your trip begins at the Galice Resort in Merlin, Oregon (11744 Galice Rd, 800/972-0430). At the pre-trip meeting we will give you your waterproof bags, go over final trip logistics and answer any last minute questions. You will leave your vehicles and keys in the secure parking area and we will transport you to the river (5-10 minutes). At the conclusion of the trip you have the option to have your personal vehicles shuttled to the take-out (recommended) or there will be a River Drifters van at the take-out to bring you back to the Galice Resort. If guests are taking the River Drifters shuttle back to Galice Resort, plan to be back at the resort after 5:30pm, as it is a 2-3 hour drive from the take-out at Foster Bar to Galice.

How to get there:

Approximate Travel Times to Galice Resort
From Portland/Vancouver: 4 hours
From Sacramento: 5 hours & 30 minutes
From Bend: 3 hours & 45 minutes

Driving Directions by Car

Take the Merlin Exit (#61) off of Interstate-5 (about 3 miles north of Grants Pass). Go west on the Merlin- Galice Road after exiting the freeway. You will pass through the town of Merlin. Continue on this road, crossing over the Hellgate Bridge and on to Galice. The Galice Resort, approximately 15 miles from the freeway, will be on your right hand side and marked by a small sign, store, and a gas pump. If you cross the Rogue a second time, you’ve gone about 7 miles too far. Please plan to arrive in Galice or the Grants Pass area the evening before your trip.

By Air

Medford, Oregon, has the nearest commercial airport with services by major airlines. It is located approximately one hour from our rendezvous point at Galice Resort. Please plan flights to arrive no later than the evening before your trip and to leave no earlier than 8pm on the last day of your trip. We can assist in arranging shuttle transportation for you between the airport and Galice.

Pre-trip Checklist
  • Complete online registration
  • Complete online waiver
  • Plan for the unexpected (travel insurance)
  • Gather and pack your gear
What we provide
  • Group rafting gear – rafts, paddles, & first aid kits
  • Optional – single or tandem inflatable kayaks
  • Personal rafting gear – PFD (personal flotation device), splash jacket & wetsuit (cooler weather trips), & helmet (optional)
  • Transportation to & from the river
  • All on-river meals, snacks, & beverages
  • Waterproof dry bag for personal gear (16” x 33”)
  • All camp cooking & kitchen supplies, including camp chairs
  • Tent, sleeping bag, and sleeping pad if you do not want to bring your own
What you are responsible for
  • Meals and lodging before and after your trip
  • Personal clothing and other miscellaneous items (see equipment list)
  • Guides gratuities (see below)
Professional Tips

Wetsuits and splash jackets are often recommended for spring and fall trips, and for guests spending time in inflatable kayaks. The wetsuits are 2-3ml “Farmer John” style, which is combined with a splash jacket to provide full-body coverage. Wetsuits and splash jackets are suggested when the air temperature is 75°F or cooler, however children and individuals who get cold easily may want these additional layers when the air temperature is forecasted to be between 75°F to 80°F. Wetsuits and splash jackets are provided by River Drifters and our guides will issue out this gear on cooler weather trips or upon request.

Fleece is a generic term for a spun, polyester fabric developed for outdoor use. It is thick and fluffy and does not absorb water, making it ideal insulation on a river trip. It is commonly called Polartec or Polar Fleece. Polypropylene is a thinner, stretchier, woven variation used predominantly for long underwear. Any polypropylene long underwear will work; heavyweight is the most versatile.

Layering your clothing is an effective way to adjust to the daily weather changes that you may encounter. A light polypropylene layer under a heavy fleece top under a rain shell will get you going on the chilliest of mornings and allow you to shed layers as the day warms up.

One of the handiest things to bring on a trip is a sarong. Versatile, comfortable and colorful, sarongs get used for quick clothing changes, beach throws, sun screens and dinner celebrations.

Dry-bags are great for keeping things dry but are somewhat awkward for packing and living out of, (they are tall and narrow with a small opening at the top). Compact sleeping bags are much more convenient, and small stuff sacks, pillow cases or zip-lock bags are helpful for dividing up your stuff inside the bag. Trying to put your entire duffel bag or luggage into the dry-bag never seems to work.

Lodging
  • Redwood Motel (Grant’s Pass) | 888-535-8824
  • Weasku Inn (Grant’s Pass) | 541-471-8000
  • The Galice Resort (our Meeting Spot) | 541-476-3818
  • Rogue Regency (Medford) | 800-535-5805
  • We recommend staying in Grants Pass or at the Galice Resort the night before the trip starts.
Camping
  • Almeda County Park (Merlin) | 541- 474- 5285 (reservable sites)
Day 1:

Check-In: Your trip leader will meet you at Galice Resort at 9:00 a.m., on the first day of your trip. There he or she will distribute waterproof dry bags, answer any last-minute questions, and help ensure your car is parked in the secure parking area and ready for shuttling if applicable. Following this introduction, you will pack your personal belongings into the dry bag. Once the group is all packed, we will load up into the River Drifters van and drive to the put-in.

Shuttle & Arrival at Put-In: The river put-in for the Wild and Scenic Section of the Rogue River is either Argo Boat Landing or Almeda County Park. Our guides will give a safety talk and provide instructions for the basic paddle strokes you will need for your trip. Then it’s time to get on the river!

On the River: Fun whitewater, peaceful calms, and magnificent scenery will fill your senses. After this initial stretch of river, we reach Rainie Falls, a thundering drop that we skirt by walking around or running a sneak channel, depending on water levels. More phenomenal rapids and scenery awaits below Rainie Falls and an expansive lunch will fuel your system for an afternoon of more rafting. We reach camp around 4:30pm – 5pm.

At Camp: Hors d’oeuvres and beverages will be provided shortly after arrival to camp. You’ll set up your tent, go for a hike, or relax by the river until dinner is served at about 7pm.

Day 2 & 3:

Morning Time: You’ll wake up to coffee brewing by 8am while your guides are busy making a healthy & hearty breakfast. After breakfast, the group will break down camp and hit the water between 9am and 10am.

On the River & At Camp: We’ll run rapid after exhilarating rapid, drift through idyllic calms, marvel at the rock formations, watch eagle & osprey as they circle overhead, and on and on. Depending on the day we may visit the historic Rogue River Ranch, now a living museum, or hike up to one of the many side creek waterfalls. Lunch is set up each day around noon, with more than enough delicious food to energize you for the afternoon’s whitewater. In the late afternoon we arrive at another beautiful campsite. The early evening hours provide time to fish, hike, read a book, enjoy happy hour snacks & beverages, or take a nap. Dinner is prepared & served by our guides around 7pm.

Last Day:

Morning: After breakfast & reloading the rafts we float the final stretch of river, enjoy lunch on the banks of this magical river, & reach the take-out, Foster Bar, in the early afternoon.

Take-Out: Guests will return any River Drifters issued equipment or gear, change into dry clothes, and salute to a great trip. You have the option to have your personal vehicles shuttled to the take-out (recommended) or there will be a River Drifters van at the take-out to bring you back to the Galice Resort. If guests are taking the River Drifters shuttle back to Galice Resort, plan to be back at the resort after 5:30pm, as it is a 2-3 hour drive from the take-out at Foster Bar to Galice.

Please keep in mind that every trip is different, as weather, water flow, campsites, and group dynamics all influence trip pace

The Rogue is a coastal river with mild weather almost year-round. However, you must be prepared for rain and wind in every season. Below is a chart of average temperatures and rainfall in Southern Oregon during the rafting season. Please check the weather forecast prior to your trip!

May June July August September
Avg Day 70°F 77°F 89°F 90°F 80°F
Avg Night 46°F 53°F 59°F 55°F 50°F
Rainfall 3″ 1.8″ 0.3″ 0.6″ 1.3″

Wetsuits and splash jackets are often recommended for spring and fall trips, and for guests spending time in inflatable kayaks. The wetsuits are 2-3ml “Farmer John” style, which is combined with a splash jacket to provide full-body coverage. Wetsuits and splash jackets are suggested when the air temperature is 75°F or cooler, however children and individuals who get cold easily may want these additional layers when the air temperature is forecasted to be between 75°F to 80°F. Wetsuits and splash jackets are provided by River Drifters and our guides will issue out this gear on cooler weather trips or upon request.

We primarily use paddle rafts but sometimes we also use oar-paddle combination rafts. Everyone should come expecting to be active participants in the trip regardless of which type of raft you end up in. If there are any physical limitations, please reach out to us so that we can make sure to accommodate any adjustments you will need.

Paddle Rafts

Paddle rafts are 13 to 15 feet long and carry between 4 and 8 paddlers who actively paddle through the rapids and down the river. Everyone has a paddle, sits on the outer tube of the raft and follows the commands of the paddle guide who sits in the rear.

Oar-Paddle Combo

Oar-paddle combination rafts are 13 to 15 feet long and are configured so that four or six paddlers can assist a guide who rows the raft using oars.

Inflatable Kayaks

Inflatable kayaks are 10 – 12 feet long and are paddled by 1 person using double-bladed paddles. They are fairly stable, require no previous experience and allow you to feel the thrill of independently paddling the river.

Please note that we do not guarantee space in inflatable kayaks. We will bring a few, but if there are more people who wish to ride in these boats than there are spaces, we will rotate so that everyone gets a chance to participate.

Oar Rafts

Oar rafts are 15 feet long, and carry all of the overnight gear. They are rowed by a guide using oars attached to a metal frame. The guide will pace ahead of the trip to be able to claim and set up the best campsite available while you enjoy the river and views.

All meals, including kid-friendly options, are supplied by River Drifters, and prepared by your guides during the trip. Meals include a wide variety of fresh meats, cheeses, grains, fruits, and vegetables. We also provide plenty of snacks and water throughout the trip. Our online registration gives guests an opportunity to share dietary needs or allergies with us prior to your trip. We ask that registration is completed at least one week before your trip so we can do our best to accommodate any needs or restrictions. Please give us a call with any specific questions about meals.

A typical day on the water includes five to eight hours of rafting, a lunch break, side excursions, and wildlife viewing. Evenings are a great time to go hiking, toss the Frisbee, read a book, take a nap, or relax by the river. Keep in mind that every trip is different, as the weather, water flow, campsites, and group dynamics all influence the trip pace and itinerary.

An approved portable toilet is included in our equipment and carried with us on all trips. There are a few campsites along the Rogue River with primitive toilet facilities, however most sites do not have toilet facilities and therefore the portable toilet is set up. If the portable toilet is needed during a trip, our guides will ensure it is set up in a private location and discuss its use and the “key” system with guests.

River Drifters practices Leave No Trace ethics, meaning we pack out all trash (including food scraps) and use only biodegradable soap for washing dishes. We expect our guests to help us adhere to Leave No Trace practices by ensuring no trash or food scraps are discarded into or along the river or left behind at camp. If you have any questions about personal sanitation, please don’t hesitate to ask your guide or give our office a call.

If you truly enjoy your trip, tipping is a great way to show your appreciation. Tipping is optional and personal, but since a lot of people ask, a customary amount is between 10 and 15 percent of the trip cost. Tips can be given to the Lead Guide who will share them with the entire crew. And the entire crew will appreciate them and put them to good use. (And thank you.)

If you still have questions, please feel free to call us (800-972-0430) or e-mail us (office@riverdrifters.net). We love to talk about our trips!

EQUIPMENT LIST

Your comfort is our top priority. River Drifters handles all the trip logistics, provides all the necessary camping provisions and rafting gear, and makes sure that you have professional, experienced, and well-trained guides. Please read through and adhere to our packing recommendations as it improves your comfort while on the river and at camp. If you have any questions about the gear or packing list, please call our office at 800-972-0430.

Come prepared for challenging weather conditions. Do not skimp on this list.

CAMP ITEMS

These will be packed in your dry bag and will generally not be available during the day.

  • Compact sleeping bag, (down or synthetic, rated to 30 degrees).
    Provided by River Drifters if you do not want to bring your own.
  • Closed-cell foam or self-inflating sleeping pad, (Thermarest, or Paco Pad).
    Provided by River Drifters if you do not want to bring your own.
  • Sleeping bag liner (will add warmth on cold nights)
  • Compact, lightweight tent*, (free-standing preferred, no wall tents please) or small tarp or ground cloth.
    Provided by River Drifters if you do not want to bring your own.
  • Your favorite pillow (an extra pillow-case is handy for organizing stuff in your bag).
  • Changes of clothing (versatile pants and shirts, cotton is fine – something exciting for dinner is welcome!)
  • Camp shoes. Our guides wear flip-flops or lightweight trail-running shoes.
  • Small towel, soap and shampoo (Campsuds and Dr. Bronner’s seem to be the most environmentally friendly; Ivory is fine).
  • Personal hygiene items, including medicine, insect repellent, dry-skin lotion, etc. Please bring double the amount needed of any essential medicine.
  • Warm jacket, (thick fleece is great – will work on-river as well – or compact/down coat).
  • Rain gear, jacket for sure, rain pants recommended
  • Small flashlight with extra batteries, (headlamps are great).
  • Book, sketch pad, journal, etc.
RIVER ITEMS

These will be worn, or packed in your personal dry-pack and will be accessible during the day

  • Base layer (comfort): swimsuit and polypro pants/tights and long-sleeved polypropylene shirt.
  • Insulation layer (warmth): thick fleece top, (pullovers work best)
  • Outer layer (waterproof): wetsuit or drysuit. River Drifters will provide wetsuits; if you have your own wetsuit or drysuit, you should bring it. No one has ever regretted renting a drysuit, (see below for more information)
  • Outer layer (waterproof): splash jacket or dry-top. River Drifters will provide splash jackets; if you have your own dry-top, you should bring it.
  • Outer layer (fashion): shorts to wear over your wetsuit
  • On your feet (protection): shoes or sandals that will stay on while swimming and are comfortable to hike in. No flip-flops, slip-ons or aqua shoes for on the river.
  • On your feet (warmth): wetsuit booties, neoprene, fleece or wool socks under your shoes
  • On your head (warmth): a fleece or wool beanie (you will be wearing a helmet)
  • On your hands (warmth): neoprene gloves or dishwashing gloves over fleece gloves, (surprisingly effective)
  • Lightweight cotton or synthetic clothing for sun protection
  • Waterproof sunscreen/block (SPF 30), lip balm
  • Sunglasses with strap, (maybe not your best pair)
  • Small water bottle, 1 quart, (essential – even if it’s just an empty plastic Gatorade bottle)
OPTIONAL ITEMS

Not absolutely necessary but you are welcome to bring them.

  • Waterproof camera
  • Sarong (very versatile)
  • Locking carabiner, handy for securing your day-pack.
  • 1 or 2 plastic garbage bags and some gallon size zip-locks for organizing gear.

We will provide: a wetsuit and splash jacket plus tent, sleeping bag, sleeping pad, chair, cup, plate, and eating utensils for each guest.

Please do not bring: Valuable jewelry, bluetooth speakers, guns or irreplaceable items.

DRYSUITS

Drysuits are waterproof coveralls (and wonderful.) They have tight-fitting latex wrist and neck gaskets and integrated neoprene or latex socks; combined with an insulation layer, they are the warmest, driest, coziest way to stay warm on the river on a cold day. They are also expensive, specialized, and fragile; even if you can find a friend who has one, they may not want to loan it to you. Oregon River Gear rents drysuits for about $199/week. You will need your own insulation layer (polypro, fleece, etc.) but if you are worried about being cold on the trip (who isn’t?), consider a drysuit.

ON THE RIVER:

ON HOT DAYS you will want clothing that dries quickly (nylon shorts and bathing suits) and something to shield you from the sun, (a high-tech SPF long-sleeved shirt or an old lightweight cotton dress shirt and maybe even lightweight long pants or capris). Also, a brimmed hat and a bandana are helpful for staying cool.

ON COOL DAYS you will want a thick, synthetic fleece top, (pullovers are best) and a sturdy, fully waterproof rain shell. You may also want fleece pants or polypropylene long underwear bottoms and rain pants, particularly before mid-July. Don’t bring a cotton sweatshirt and a windbreaker; cotton is worthless when wet and won’t work for on-river insulation and you need something waterproof over your fleece.

ON YOUR FEET you will want shoes that stay on if you go for a swim and are comfortable for hiking. Sport sandals with heel straps (Tevas, Chacos, Keen, etc.) work well, (buckles are better than velcro). Old running shoes work well and are easy to find. Neoprene, wool or fleece socks will add a bit of insulation under shoes or sandals. Wetsuit booties work but can be a bit clammy after a full day.

Think layers. The key to being comfortable on the Rogue is being dry and adaptable; a thin synthetic layer (polypro) next to your skin with a thick synthetic layer (fleece) over it with a waterproof layer (wetsuit and splash jacket or drysuit) over that seems to work the best. Feet and hands get cold easily and we suggest wetsuit booties or neoprene socks under sturdy shoes and neoprene gloves or fleece and dishwashing gloves. Cotton is worthless when wet and should not be used for on-river insulation.

IN CAMP

In camp you will want comfortable walking/hiking shoes, (flip flops, lightweight boots or tennis shoes), and versatile clothing, (T-shirts, warm shirts, cotton shorts, jeans or sweats, extra fleece, etc). Cotton is fine for camp stuff, but because it is worthless for keeping you warm on the river, many people bring two sets of fleece – one for the river, one for camp – and have a backup in case one gets drenched.

Professional Dressing Tips

‘Fleece’ is a generic term for a spun, polyester fabric developed for outdoor use. It is thick and fluffy and does not absorb water, making it ideal insulation on a river trip. It is commonly called Polartec or Polarfleece. Polypropylene is a thinner, stretchier, woven variation used predominantly for long underwear. Any polypropylene long underwear will work; heavyweight is the most versatile.

Layering your clothing is an effective way to adjust to the daily weather changes that you may encounter. A light polypropylene layer under a heavy fleece top under a rain shell will get you going on the chilliest of mornings and allow you to shed layers as the day warms up.

Our guides say that one of the handiest things to bring on a trip is a sarong. Versatile, comfortable and colorful, sarongs get used for quick clothing changes, beach throws, sun screens and dinner celebrations.

Where to find it:

Local outdoor or sporting goods stores should have everything you need and fleece garments are now available at most department and closeout stores. Great selections of river trip gear are also available on-line through:

  • Pacific River Supply (drysuit rentals)
  • Northwest River Supplies
  • Columbia Sportswear
  • REI
  • Patagonia
Professional Shopping Tip
  • Thrift Store

CAMP ITEMS go in a watertight dry bag provided by River Drifters (one per person). These are not accessible during the day. Each bag is roughly 16 inches in diameter and about 33 inches tall (the size of a garbage bag). ALL your personal items, including sleeping bag and pad, must fit inside this one bag (tents can be separate). Although we will show you how to close the dry bag so that it stays watertight even if temporarily submerged, packing your sleeping bag in a garbage bag provides extra protection. Zip-lock bags and small stuff sacks are good for keeping track of small and/or wet things inside your bag.

RIVER ITEMS will go in a watertight dry-pack provided by River Drifters (one per person). These small packs are 11 inches in diameter and 24 inches tall, perfect for rain gear, fleece, sunblock, and other things you want to keep handy during the day. For expensive cameras we recommend a Pelican Box, which can be found at most surplus and outdoor stores.

Professional Packing Tip

Our dry-bags are great for keeping things dry but are somewhat awkward for packing and living out of, (they are tall and narrow with a small opening at the top). Compact sleeping bags are much more convenient, and small stuff sacks, pillow cases or zip-lock bags are helpful for dividing up your stuff inside the bag. Trying to put your entire duffel bag or luggage into the dry-bag never seems to work.

Rogue River Multi-Day Rafting Trips

Rogue River Three-Day

Season: April - October
Duration: 3 Days, 2 Nights
Length: 40 miles
Price: $795-975
Rapids: I-IV
Skill Level: Family and beginner friendly
Age Minimum: 8
Trip Itinerary

BOOK NOW Customized trips: call for booking info. 8 person minimum.
Rogue River Rafting

Rogue River Four-Day

Season: April - October
Duration: 4 Days, 3 Nights
Length: 40 miles
Price: $1050-1250
Rapids: I-IV
Skill Level: Family and beginner friendly
Age Minimum: 8
Trip Itinerary

Are you ready for your rafting adventure on the Rogue River?